Describe the major bones muscles joints

From our head to our toes, our bones provide support for our bodies and help form our shape.

Describe the major bones muscles joints

Every time you walk, settle into a chair, or hug your child, you're using your bones, muscles, and joints. Without these important body parts, we wouldn't be able to stand, walk, run, or even sit.

Describe the major bones muscles joints

Bones and What They Do From our head to our toes, bones provide support for our bodies and help form our shape. The skull protects the brain and forms the shape of our face. The spinal cord, a pathway for messages between the brain and the body, is protected by the backbone, or spinal column.

The ribs form a cage that shelters the heart, lungs, liver, and spleen, and the pelvis helps protect the bladder, intestines, and in women, the reproductive organs.

Although they're very light, bones are strong enough to support our entire weight. The human skeleton has bones, which begin to develop before birth. When the skeleton first forms, it is made of flexible cartilage, but within a few weeks it begins the process of ossification.

Ossification is when the cartilage is replaced by hard deposits of calcium phosphate and stretchy collagen, the two main components of bone. It takes about 20 years for this process to be completed. The bones of kids and young teens are smaller than those of adults and contain "growing zones" called growth plates.

These plates consist of columns of multiplying cartilage cells that grow in length, and then change into hard, mineralized bone.

Recently Answered

These growth plates are easy to spot on an X-ray. Because girls mature at an earlier age than boys, their growth plates change into hard bone at an earlier age.

Growing Bones Bone-building continues throughout life, as a body constantly renews and reshapes the bones' living tissue. Bone contains three types of cells: Osteoclasts are very active in kids and teens, working on bone as it is remodeled during growth. They also play an important role in the repair of fractures.

Bones are made up of calcium, phosphorus, sodium, and other minerals, as well as the protein collagen. Calcium is needed to make bones hard, which allows them to support body weight.

Bones also store calcium and release some into the bloodstream when it's needed by other parts of the body. The amounts of certain vitamins and minerals that you eat, especially vitamin D and calciumdirectly affects how much calcium is stored in the bones. The soft bone marrow inside many of the bones is where most of the blood cells are made.

The bone marrow contains stem cellswhich produce the body's red blood cells and platelets, and some types of white blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen to the body's tissues, and platelets help with blood clotting when someone has a cut or wound.

White blood cells help the body fight infection. Bones are made up of two types of bone tissues: Compact bone is the solid, hard, outside part of the bone.

This type of bone makes up the most of the human skeleton. It looks like ivory and is extremely strong.

Alternative Names

Holes and channels run through it, carrying blood vessels and nerves from the periosteum, the bone's outer membrane covering. Cancellous bone, which looks like a sponge, is inside the compact bone.

It is made up of a mesh-like network of tiny pieces of bone called trabeculae. This is where red and white blood cells are formed in the marrow. Bones are fastened to other bones by long, fibrous straps called ligaments.

Cartilage, a flexible, rubbery substance in our joints, supports bones and protects them where they rub against each other. Muscles and What They Do Bones don't work alone — they need help from the muscles and joints.

Describe the major bones muscles joints

Muscles pull on the joints, allowing us to move. They also help your body perform other functions so you can grow and remain strong, such as chewing food and then moving it through the digestive system. The human body has more than muscles, which make up half of a person's body weight.

They are connected to bones by tough, cord-like tissues called tendons, which allow the muscles to pull on bones.Functions of Joints Joints connect bones within your body, bear weight and enable you to move.

They are made up of bone, muscles, synovial fluid, cartilage and ligaments. Bones don't work alone — they need help from the muscles and joints. Muscles pull on the joints, allowing us to move. They also help your body perform other functions so you can grow and remain strong, such as chewing food and then moving it through the digestive system.

The human musculoskeletal system (also known as the locomotor system, and previously the activity system) is an organ system that gives humans the ability to move using their muscular and skeletal alphabetnyc.com musculoskeletal system provides form, support, stability, and movement to the body.

It is made up of the bones of the skeleton, .

Joint - Wikipedia

The following are problems that can affect the bones, muscles, and joints in teens: Arthritis. Arthritis is the inflammation of a joint, and people who have it experience swelling, . The joints that connect your fingers to your hands and your thigh bone to your lower leg bone at the knee are condylar joints.

Saddle joints have one bone shaped like a saddle that the other bone fits into with a complementary shape, like two pieces of a jigsaw alphabetnyc.comd: Jun 17, Describe the changes that happen to the bones, muscles, and joints as a person ages and what a person can do about it.5/5(4).

Bones, Muscles, and Joints