A description of the famous short story where are you going

Every story is part of the literary canon and is suitable for deep reading and studying the usual story elements: His brother, Sonny, is a jazz musician with a heroin problem. The public responds enthusiastically at first, but eventually loses interest. She processes the news over the next hour, experiencing a range of emotions.

A description of the famous short story where are you going

Oates may have drawn on the Persephone myth for her short story. Source "Where Are You Going? Where Have You Been? Oates draws on mythology, music, and modern culture in order to create her story. Here is a summary, analysis and breakdown of some of the sources and inspiration she used along with an interpretation of their meaning.

Just like any teenager she sneaks around, going to a drive-in restaurant to meet boys rather than to the movies like she told her family.

She is rebellious and flippant and has a bad relationship with her mother. She shrugs it off as a creepy guy. Arnold Friend and his side kick Ellie show up in his gold convertible.

After she runs in the house and makes a failed attempt to call for help, he lures her out. As if under a spell, Connie obeys him and the story ends with her walking down the path to the car.

The implication is that she will never return. Schmid killed three young women before he was caught. Known as the Pied Piper of Tucson, Schmid befriended his victims, partying and hanging out with them, before he murdered them.

The Pied Piper reference refers to his almost mystical ability to lure the victims to their death. This shows the first mythical reference, the Pied Piper, that Oates used to build the layers of the story.

Much like the PIed Piper, Friend is able to lure Connie out of the house and to her probable death using only his words and the strange sounds of the music that was playing both in the house and in his car.

But the use of myth goes even deeper. Mythology Joyce Carol Oates draws heavily on mythology in order to build the core of her story. Comparing Connie to the mythical Persephone helps the reader to understand her place, her actions and who Arnold Friend really seems to be.

In the myth of Persephone, the young goddess and daughter of Zeus and Demeter is kidnapped by god of the underworld, Hades. Demeter, the goddess who controlled the seasons and harvest, was so distraught that the land became barren.

Zeus was forced to intervene and command that Hades return Persephone to her mother. Hades complied but he tricked Persephone into eating a pomegranate before she left.

The significance of this act meant that she would have to return to the underworld. Is Arnold Friend a modern day Pied Piper?

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Connie represents the gullable Persephone, and Friend is Hades. However, Oates gives Friend some more sinister charcteristics, more recognizable as the modern interpretation of the devil rather than just the god of the underworld.

This would help the modern reader to recognize who he truly is and what his intentions are. His hair seems to be a wig and is lopsided horns? Modern Culture Oates seems to be pointing a finger at modern culture. By blending the mythical elements of the Persephone myth with rock music and the invincible attitude of Connie, Oates highlights the dangers of modern youth.

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Rock music is playing in all of the important scenes of the story. While the meaning to Friend may be different, the message from Oates to the reader is clear.This tender story -- one of the most famous titles in the short story genre -- is a must-read.

A description of the famous short story where are you going

The story is about a young couple and how they meet the challenge of buying each other a Christmas gifts when they don't have enough money. This sentimental tale has a moral lesson and is widely enjoyed during Christmastime and the holiday season.

A description of the famous short story where are you going

Short Stories for College Students | University Students This page contains a wide selection of short fiction appropriate for college / university students.

Every story is part of the literary canon and is suitable for deep reading and studying the usual story elements: plot, point of view, character, setting, tone and style, theme, and symbol.

Watch video · 5. "The Stormchasers", by Adam Marek (published in The Best British Short Stories ) What's it about? A father takes his son out on a drive to try and track down a storm.

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Why should you read it? The description above doesn't do this story justice, but I don't want to say too much because it risks giving away the ending. Dig into this curated list of freely available classic short stories by famous authors. Think of short stories as a sample of famous authors' styles, themes and general prose.

Sep 21,  · If your students are struggling to get into the short story, or you're pressed for time, here are some very brief stories to get you started. They're not as short as Hemingway's famous six-word story (For sale: baby shoes, never worn.), but they're manageable even for reluctant alphabetnyc.coms: Famous Short Stories Short stories are much loved by people of all ages and have enthralled people of all ages.

Here is a list of the most loved and well-known short stories.

May 20,  · Watch video · 13 of the best Stephen King short stories you've never read. Share. Tweet. you know they're going to discover something down there. And you know it's not going to be good. the description. Jan 13,  · Watch video · "The Stormchasers", by Adam Marek (published in The Best British Short Stories ) What's it about? A father takes his son out on a drive to try and track down a storm. There’s a difference between writing an anecdote (the type of story you would tell a friend over dinner) and a quality short story (the type of story where readers are set inside the action). Take these two different types of writing, for example.
These Classic Stories Are So Short, You Have No Excuse Not To Read Them | HuffPost